`To me, it’s not about immigration status’: Divergent perceptions of legal status among undocumented college students

Published by Daniel Millán In this article, I draw upon interviews with 30 students enrolled in a University of California campus to analyze how undocumented students perceived the extent to which legal status shaped their academic experiences. Divergent perceptions were shaped by immigration policies, exposure to prevalent narratives, and the extent to which immigration statusContinue reading “`To me, it’s not about immigration status’: Divergent perceptions of legal status among undocumented college students”

Situational triggers and protective locations: conceptualising the salience of deportability in everyday life

Published by Laura E. Enriquez and Daniel Millán (Equal authorship) Previous research has documented the severe consequences of deportation and conceptualized deportability as a key factor that produces and sustains immigrant illegality. Drawing on interview and survey data with 1.5 generation undocumented young adults in California, we explore the mechanisms that structure the salience ofContinue reading “Situational triggers and protective locations: conceptualising the salience of deportability in everyday life”

Mediating Illegality: Federal, State, and Institutional Policies in the Educational Experiences of Undocumented College Students

Published by Laura E. Enriquez, Martha Morales Hernandez, Daniel Millán, and Daisy Vazquez Vera Immigration federalism scholarship has established that state and local government policies can make federally defined immigration status more or less consequential. Drawing primarily on focus groups and interviews with 184 undocumented students attending the University of California, we suggest that institutionalContinue reading “Mediating Illegality: Federal, State, and Institutional Policies in the Educational Experiences of Undocumented College Students”